Why does Title IX matter?

Moral Perspective

As a premier international research university, the University of Kansas is committed to an open, diverse and inclusive learning and working environment that nurtures growth and development of all. The University of Kansas is a safe community and we strive to have procedures and resources in place to support a safe community. When students are unable to feel safe on campus, the educational mission of the university is put in jeopardy. By ensuring that sexual harassment or violence of any form is not tolerated and that proper action is taken when it happens, the university aspires to protect the dignity of all students and create a safe and open environment for the Jayhawk community.

It’s easy to want to believe that the national statistics don’t apply to the KU campus. A look at data specifically from KU students tells a different story. According to data from a Spring 2015 National College Health Association survey ​[1]:

  • 9.6% of female students report sexual touching without their consent
  • 3.7% of female students report sexual penetration attempt without their consent
  • 2.1% of female students report sexual penetration without their consent
  • 3.6% of male students report sexual touching without their consent
  • 1.8% of male students report sexual penetration attempt without their consent
  • 1.8% of male students report sexual penetration without their consent
  • 8.5% of all students report an emotionally abusive relationship
  • 1.8% of all students report a physically abusive relationship
  • 2.0% of all students report a sexually abusive relationship

There were 613 respondents to the survey. The total enrollment at KU in Spring 2015 was approximately 26,300. Applying these statistics to the total student body:

  • 1293 female students report sexual touching without their consent
  • 498 female students report sexual penetration attempt without their consent
  • 283 female students report sexual penetration without their consent
  • 461 male students report sexual touching without their consent
  • 230 male students report sexual penetration attempt without their consent
  • 230 male students report sexual penetration without their consent
  • 2235 of all students report an emotionally abusive relationship
  • 473 of all students report a physically abusive relationship
  • 526 of all students report a sexually abusive relationship

Educational Perspective

Many of the physical, physiological, and emotional effects of sexual harassment will be discussed in the next section of the manual. However, just some of those effects include, pain, nausea, headaches, trouble sleeping, panic attacks, eating problems, depression, difficulty concentrating, and impaired memory. It is easy to see from this list of effects how a complainant’s education might be affected.

Students who have experienced sexual harassment, especially sexual assault, are at a greater risk of withdrawing from their college education because they are unable to concentrate in class, are constantly reminded of the traumatic experience they survived, or need to take time away from school to heal. Survivors of sexual assault can experience post-traumatic stress disorder and may require extended counseling and therapy.

It is imperative that the entire university community work together to prevent incidents from happening. When they do, the university will work with the survivor to assist in seeking out advocate support, counseling, and making academic accommodations regardless of whether the survivor decides to file a formal complaint with the university or legal authorities.

 

[1] American College Health Association. (2015). National college health assessment II. Hanover, MD.


Mandatory Sexual Harassment Training Info

Student Affairs Monthly Update

Student Affairs Events

One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
44 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times